The Nexus in Computing degree program enables students to rapidly gain a broad understanding of the ever changing field of Computing. Students will deepen their knowledge and sharpen their skills in a technical and career-focused area of specialization, and complete their career preparation with an internship experience with an industry partner. Upon graduation, students will find employment in high-demand careers in areas such as cybersecurity, system and network administration, application development, and data analytics.

The Nexus degree is a unique new academic credential created by the University System of Georgia to help more Georgians access careers in high demand areas. The Nexus in Computing is a flexible and stackable credential that can be completed on its own or in addition to a bachelor degree in another discipline. Further, since it is embedded within the BS in Computing program (credits earned toward the Nexus in Computing will apply toward a BS in Computing), it also provides a direct pathway to a four-year degree.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog.

Program Location

Carrollton Campus, Online

Method of Delivery

This program is designed to be flexible to meet individual student needs and can be completed fully online, face-to-face, or a hybrid combination of the two.

Accreditation

The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Credit and transfer

Total semester hours required: 60

Visit Undergraduate Admissions for details on applying to UWG, dates and deadlines, cost of attendance, etc. Additional details on costs are available from the Office of Student Accounts and Billing Services.

Coursework

The Nexus degree consists of 60 semester-credit hours (half of the 120 credit-hours required for a bachelors degree) and includes 42 hours of general education core, 12 hours of upper-division coursework in a Computing specialization targeted toward a high-demand career area, and 6 hours of an internship experience with an industry partner.

General

Core Curriculum (60 hours) - Specific core requirements for this program include: MATH 1111 or 1401 required in Core Area A.2 (MATH 1401 required for Data Analytics specialization); PHIL 2030 required in Core Area C.2; CS 1030 required in Core Area D.2

An introduction to the concepts, usage, and uses of computers. Topics include the social and ethical aspects of computing; the Internet, including the creation of Web pages; overview of computer architecture, operating systems, and applications; an introduction to algorithms and programming using Visual BASIC.

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This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions and their graphs. This includes linear, quadratic, piece-wide defined, inequalities, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included.Credit for Math 1111 is not allowed if the student already has credit for Math 1113 or higher.

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This is a non-calculus based introduction to statistics. Course content includes descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistical topics.Prerequisites: Math 1101 Mathematical Modeling, 1111 College Algebra, or 1113 Precalculus or approved equivalent.

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An introduction to the central concepts in ethics and an exploration of such contemporary ethical issues as abortion, genetic engineering, euthanasia, and capital punishment. Required for the major in Philosophy.

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Experiential Learning

Completion of 6 hours of an internship experience is required regardless of chosen specialization.

A hands-on supervised field experience in computing. Students will create and present a comprehensive portfolio documenting the field experience.

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Specialization: Application Development

This course introduces object-oriented concepts. Topics include classes, objects, encapsulation, inheritance, and interfaces. Additional topics may include File I/O, Graphical User Interfaces, and related tools and technologies.

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This course introduces students to the effective practices, principles, and patterns of software development and testing.

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In this course students will learn and apply effective practices, principles, and patterns of large-scale software development and testing as part of collaborative development teams.

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This course explores the three fundamental aspects of computer science--theory, abstraction, and design--as the students develop moderately complex software in a high-level programming language. It will emphasize problem solving, algorithm development, and object-oriented design and programming. This course may not be attempted more than three times without department approval.

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Specialization: Cybersecurity

This course provides a broad survey of computer systems. It covers topics such as basics of computer architecture and organization, operating systems, computer networking, programming, mobile and web development.

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This course introduces the fundamentals of computer security in protection of modern computer systems. Topics include hardware and software components of modern computer systems, various security vulnerabilities and threats, and security practices and measures to safeguard against these threats.

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This course covers the fundamentals of network and operating system theory and practice. Topics include the TCP/IP protocol stack, routing, basic OS administration, and basic network services.

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This course provides an overview of computer and network security and countermeasure techniques. Topics include cryptography, Public Key Infrastructures (PKI), viruses, malware, security of different layers of the TCP/IP, Firewall, and VPN, TLS, Bitcoin, and Web security. Techniques and tools used in defending network security will also be covered.

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Specialization: Data Analytics

MATH 1401 must be taken in Core Area A.2 for this specialization.

This course introduces the fundamentals of database systems. Topics include database design, implementation, and manipulation in a traditional database system, such as a relational database system.

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This course introduces the basics of data science and data analytics to extract information from unstructured data. Topics include technologies, techniques, and tools in data collection, storage, processing, and analysis.

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This course introduces the advanced DB topics, such as stored procedures, functions, triggers, indexes, performance tuning and query optimization.

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This course introduces two fundamental aspects of computer science--abstraction and design--as students learn to develop programs in a high-level programming language. Students will study and implement a variety of applications, including graphics and scientific simulations. The course assumes no prior background in programming or computer science.

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This is a non-calculus based introduction to statistics. Course content includes descriptive statistics, probability theory, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistical topics.Prerequisites: Math 1101 Mathematical Modeling, 1111 College Algebra, or 1113 Precalculus or approved equivalent.

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Specialization: System and Network Administration

This course provides a broad survey of computer systems. It covers topics such as basics of computer architecture and organization, operating systems, computer networking, programming, mobile and web development.

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This course introduces the fundamentals of computer security in protection of modern computer systems. Topics include hardware and software components of modern computer systems, various security vulnerabilities and threats, and security practices and measures to safeguard against these threats.

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This course covers the fundamentals of network and operating system theory and practice. Topics include the TCP/IP protocol stack, routing, basic OS administration, and basic network services.

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This course covers the advanced topics of network and operating system administration. Topics include technologies and tools in virtualization of computing resources, cloud-based systems and services, among others.

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Raihan Ahmed, M.S.

Raihan Ahmed, M.S.

Senior Lecturer in Computer Science

Lewis Baumstark, Ph.D.

Lewis Baumstark, Ph.D.

Professor of Computer Science

Technology Learning Center
Room 2215
Marion Franklin Cannon, MSIT

Marion Franklin Cannon, MSIT

Lecturer in Computer Science

Technology Learning Center
Room 2224
Jonathan Corley, Ph.D.

Jonathan Corley, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Computer Science

Technology Learning Center
Room 2219
Michael Orsega, Ph.D.

Michael Orsega, Ph.D.

Professor of Computer Science & Graduate Program Coordinator

Mostafizur Rahman, Ph.D.

Mostafizur Rahman, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Computer Science

Anja Remshagen, Ph.D.

Anja Remshagen, Ph.D.

Professor of Computer Science & Program Coordinator

Ana Stanescu, Ph.D.

Ana Stanescu, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Computer Science

Technology Learning Center
Room 2-217
Tracey Wilson, M.Ed., M.S.

Tracey Wilson, M.Ed., M.S.

Lecturer in Computer Science

Li Yang, Ph.D.

Li Yang, Ph.D.

Professor of Computer Science

Duane Yoder, Ph.D.

Duane Yoder, Ph.D.

Chair, Department of Computing and Mathematics & Associate Professor of Computer Science

Technology Learning Center
Room 2206

Guidelines for Admittance

Visit Undergraduate Admissions for details on applying to UWG, dates and deadlines, cost of attendance, etc.                

  • Visit Undergraduate Admissions for details on applying to UWG, dates and deadlines, cost of attendance, etc.
  • The Scoop, published by the Office of the Registrar, is a collection of calendars and other important information related to registration, courses, fees, and schedules.
                

Student Learning Outcomes
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the selected computing concentration to identify solutions to a computing problem under guidance.
  2. Demonstrate professional skills in implementing solutions to a computing problem in the selected computing concentration under guidance.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to function effectively as a member of a team engaged in activities appropriate to the selected computing concentration.