Here at UWG, we study religion from a comparative and philosophical perspective. Rather than advocating for any particular religion, or for or against religion more generally, we instead seek to better describe and explain diverse examples of religious beliefs, texts, practices, and traditions, and to understand the role they play in shaping the areas of human life mentioned above.

For more information, please see the Academic Catalog.

The minor in religion requires six courses totaling 18 credit hours:
PHIL 2010: Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 2020: Critical Thinking OR PHIL 2030: Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 2130: Introduction to World Religions

Three (3) courses chosen from the following, at least two (2) of which must be PHIL courses:
PHIL 3205: Theories of Religion
PHIL 3220: Christian Thought
PHIL 4220: Hermeneutics
PHIL 4230: Philosophy of Religion
ANTH 4170: Myth, Magic and Religion
HIST 4478: American Religion to 1800
HIST 4479: American Religion Since 1800
PSYC 4130: Eastern and Transpersonal Psychologies
SOCI 3543: The Sociology of Religion

Career Opportunities

Buzzfile - Careers by Major:
http://www.buzzfile.com/Major/Religion External Resource

Program Location

Carrollton Campus

Method of Delivery

Most classes are face to face

Accreditation

The University of West Georgia is accredited by The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC).

Credit and transfer

Total semester hours required: 18

This program may be earned entirely face-to-face. However, depending on the courses chosen, a student may choose to take some partially or fully online courses.

Save money

UWG is often ranked as one of the most affordable accredited universities of its kind, regardless of the method of delivery chosen.

Details

  • Total tuition costs and fees may vary, depending on the instructional method of the courses in which the student chooses to enroll.
  • The more courses a student takes in a single term, the more they will typically save in fees and total cost.
  • Face-to-face or partially online courses are charged at the general tuition rate and all mandatory campus fees, based on the student's residency (non-residents are charged at a higher rate).
  • Fully or entirely online course tuition rates and fees my vary depending on the program. Students enrolled in exclusively online courses do not pay non-Resident rates.
  • Together this means that GA residents pay about the same if they take all face-to-face or partially online courses as they do if they take only fully online courses exclusively; while non-residents save money by taking fully online courses.
  • One word of caution: If a student takes a combination of face-to-face and online courses in a single term, he/she will pay both all mandatory campus fees and the higher eTuition rate.
  • For cost information, as well as payment deadlines, see the Student Accounts and Billing Services website

There are a variety of financial assistance options for students, including scholarships and work study programs. Visit the Office of Financial Aid's website for more information.

Coursework

The minor in religion requires six courses totaling 18 credit hours:
PHIL 2010: Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 2020: Critical Thinking OR PHIL 2030: Introduction to Ethics
PHIL 2130: Introduction to World Religions

Three (3) courses chosen from the following, at least two (2) of which must be PHIL courses:
PHIL 3205: Theories of Religion
PHIL 3220: Christian Thought
PHIL 4220: Hermeneutics
PHIL 4230: Philosophy of Religion
ANTH 4170: Myth, Magic and Religion
HIST 4478: American Religion to 1800
HIST 4479: American Religion Since 1800
PSYC 4130: Eastern and Transpersonal Psychologies
SOCI 3543: The Sociology of Religion

General

A comparative and cross-cultural approach to religious systems and theories on the anthropology of religion.

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A study of the history of American religious beliefs, practices, and influences on American society, from its colonial settlement to 1800.

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A study of the history of American religious beliefs and practices, and religion's influence on American society, from 1800 to the present.

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A historically framed introduction to philosophy,high-lighting major developments that have defined Western philosophical inquiry. Required for the major in Philosophy.

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An investigation of logical fallacies and patterns of valid reasoning in primarily oral by also written discourse. Required for the major in Philosophy.

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A comparative study of the beliefs and practices of several world religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course not only explores the history of these faiths and their early doctrinal and communal development, but their place in today's world.

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This course examines some of the most important historical developments in the Western academic study of religion. Topics covered include: how to define and conceptualize religion itself; the role the concept of religion has played in colonialism and indigenous responses; the function of religion in relation to human psychology, identity, society, and politics; the insider/outsider problem; the distinction between religious studies and theology; and the role and importance of various aspects of religion including texts, practices, community, and institutional authority.

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This course examines the development of Christian thought from the New Testament to present day (e.g. feminist and liberation theologies). A sample of thinkers to be considered includes Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Schleiermacher, Barth, and Bultmann. Required for religion-track majors.

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Hermeneutics is the philosophical discipline investigating the process of textual interpretation. How do we know how to interpret what we read? Is the meaning of a text what the author intended? How would we know what an author intended? Should we understand a text within a historical context? This course addresses the development of the hermeneutic tradition through the primary tests of such influential philosophers as Friedrich Schleiemacher, Martin Heidegger, Hans-Georg Gadamer, and Paul Ricoeur.

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An examination of philosophical arguments about such religious questions as the existence of God, the problem of evil, the relationship between faith and reason, and the concept of human destiny. Required for Religion Track majors.

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Introduction to spiritual experience and its understanding in Hinduism, Buddhism, and Transpersonal psychologies.

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This course focuses on sociology of religious experience, action, organizations, movements and social change; contemporary trends, including mainline and new religions, civil religion, secularization.

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Rosemary Kellison, Ph.D.

Rosemary Kellison, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion; Philosophy Program Coordinator

Technology Learning Center 2245

Guidelines for Admittance

Each UWG online degree program has specific requirements that you must meet in order to enroll.

Admission Process Checklist

  1. Review Admission Requirements for the different programs and guides for specific populations (non-traditional, transfer, transient, home school, joint enrollment students, etc).
  2. Review important deadlines:
    • Fall semester: June 1 (undergrads)
    • Spring semester: November 15 (undergrads)
    • Summer semester: May 15 (undergrads)
      See program specific calendars here
  3. Complete online application
    Undergraduate Admissions Guide

    Undergraduate Application

    Undergraduate International Application

  4. Submit $40 non-refundable application fee
  5. Submit official documents

    Request all official transcripts and test scores be sent directly to UWG from all colleges or universities attended. If a transcript is mailed to you, it cannot be treated as official if it has been opened. Save time by requesting transcripts be sent electronically.

    Undergraduate & Graduate Applicants should send all official transcripts to:
    Office of Undergraduate Admissions, Murphy Building
    University of West Georgia
    1601 Maple Street
    Carrollton, GA 30118-4160
  6. Submit a Certificate of Immunization, if required. If you will not ever be traveling to a UWG campus or site, you may apply for an Immunization Exemption. Contact the Immunization Clerk with your request.
  7. Check the status of your application

Contact

philprog@westga.edu

Specific dates for admissions (Undergraduates Only), go to: UWG Admission Deadlines

  • Describe the distinct beliefs and practices of the world's major religions.
  • Describe, and evaluate responses to, a philosophical question pertaining to religious belief and experience.
  • Identify and describe two central themes of religious literature.
  • Compare and contrast theology and philosophy as distinct methods of inquiry.