No quizzes or pesky term papers. No parking problems or tuition fees. Just the best university professors, the most captivating lectures, and wine.

Come be part of a dynamic learning environment with important, intriguing, and, yes, curious topics of interest to everyone.

For Spring 2019, University of West Georgia professors Micheal Crafton, Dionne Irving Bremyer, Mark Schoon, Stephanie Chalifoux, Josh Byrd, Nathan Rees, Patrick Erben, and New York Times best-selling author Theresa Brown come to Newnan, Carrollton, and Serenbe to discuss topics in Language, History, Music, and Art.

To be eligible for great door prizes, make sure to RSVP at the event links below. You must be present the night of the event to win.

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR

with Dr. Micheal Crafton, University Provost and Professor of English

THE PRICE OF THE TICKET: COMPLICATING TRAVEL

with Dr. Dionne Irving Bremyer, Associate Professor of English

Tuesday, February 5 | 6:00 pm reception, 6:30 pm talk
The Hub at Hudson Mill, Carrollton

The history of travel runs parallel to the history of colonial rule, whose darker realities linger in even the sunniest of destinations. In service of profit, tourism attempts to distract from this troubling past. But can we confront those realities, engage in thoughtful, responsible travel, and still have a little fun? Join us for some answers.
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LIFE ON THE MOON IN THE 1830s

with Mark Schoon, Associate Professor of Art

Tuesday, February 19 | 6:00 pm reception, 6:30 pm talk
Hawthorne Room, The Inn at Serenbe
For centuries the moon had remained an unattainable subject of speculation and desire. Through a series of illustrated newspaper articles in 1835, however, much of this speculation was to be set straight, as claims of exotic landscapes, flora, and fauna were attributed to the famed astronomer Sir John Herchel. Join us for a look at this and other instances when scientific representation competes with our desires and basic reasoning.
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A REVOLUTION IN MANNERS AND MORALS

with Dr. Stephanie Chalifoux, Assistant Professor of History

Tuesday, March 5 | 6:00 pm reception, 6:30 pm talk
The Hub at Hudson Mill, Carrollton
Think the 1960s was the era of youthful rebellion? Thing again, daddy-o. In the 1920s, young Americans engaged in dating and dalliances that challenged their parents' ideas of respectable behavior. Come hear about the music, manners, and morals of 1920s modern society in a talk that is sure to be the cat's pajamas. Flappers and big-timers welcome.
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SPECIAL EVENT: NEW YORK TIMES BEST-SELLING AUTHOR THERESA BROWN

Tuesday, March 12 | 6:00 pm reception, 6:30 pm talk
UWG Center, Newnan
Join us for a reading and discussion by New York Times best-selling author Theresa Brown. Former English professor turned nurse, Brown will read from her latest book, The Shift, which chronicles a day in the life of a nurse. Don't miss this opportunity to hear from this groundbreaking author, recipient of the Blackwell Prize in Writing (worth $10,000), administered by UWG's School of the Arts.
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READING BEHIND THE LINES (AND SPACES)

with Dr. Josh Byrd, Associate Professor of Music

Hawthorne Room, The Inn at Serenbe
Tuesday, April 2 | 6:00 pm reception, 6:30 pm talk
Music is much more than notes on a page. But how do performers read beyond the notation? What makes one interpretation different from the next? This session will reveal what lies behind the lines.
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ICON OR IDOL: ART AND THE SECOND COMMANDMENT

with Dr. Nathan Rees, Assistant Professor of Art

Tuesday, April 9 | 6:00 pm reception, 6:30 pm talk
UWG Center, Newnan
From ancient Rabbinic writers to Byzantine iconoclasts and Protestant reformers, theologians have interpreted the second commandment in dramatically different ways. Come encounter the contentious history of graven images as we explore how mixing art and religion sparked the Bonfire of the Vanities, landed the painter Veronese before the Inquisition, and resulted in a masterpiece by Michelangelo being painted over.
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THE MANY FACES OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

with Dr. Patrick Erben, Professor of English

Tuesday, April 23 | 6:00 pm reception, 6:30 pm talk
Carnegie Library, Newnan
Printer, politician, scientist, and philanthropist, Benjamin Franklin was above all a master of creating self-images that served many situations--from the pomp of the French court to the muddy streets of Philadelphia. Join us as we consider the ways in which Franklin turned himself into one of American's most enduring cultural myths.
-No alcohol served.-
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